This website was launched in November 2001, with the Salt Lake City Olympics on the horizon in February 2002. Originally called “SkiJumpingCentral,” the intent was that it would serve as a central resource for folks in the USA to find out more about the sport, where clubs were located, where domestic news about the sport could be found, along with links to FIS international competition. The domain “SkiJumpingUSA” became available in 2011; we grabbed it and it’s been our name ever since. In our early years, we provided a lot of weekly competition coverage for domestic and international ski jumping, usually in the form of short articles with link to results. In recent years, we’ve increasingly been directing folks to the FIS & USA Nordic sites for news, schedules, & results, and we’ll continue to do that. ----->
Today, USA Nordic has become the main organization behind the sports of ski jumping and Nordic Combined in the US, and it includes both the men’s and women’s national teams. They have a comprehensive website, and it’s been redesigned for the 2022 season. Over the years, FIS has made their official websites for both jumping and NC much easier to navigate. They provide real-time scoring, and final results of qualifying and competition are reported immediately This site will now concentrate more on features than on-going news. Our new format will be released in several steps before the beginning of 2022. We hope you’ll continue to visit as we complete this transition. Click large LOGOS for websites, month LINKS for calendar & results, big blue buttons for FACEBOOK .
SJUSA After 20 years, it’s time for a new model
2021-22 SJ Calendar & Results NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR
2021-22 N/C Calendar & Results NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR
USA Nordic Website
This website was launched in November 2001, with the Salt Lake City Olympics on the horizon in February 2002. Originally called “SkiJumpingCentral,” the intent was that it would serve as a central resource for folks in the USA to find out more about the sport, where clubs were located, where domestic news about the sport could be found, along with links to FIS international competition. The domain “SkiJumpingUSA” became available in 2011; we grabbed it and it’s been our name ever since. In our early years, we provided a lot of weekly competition coverage for domestic and international ski jumping, usually in the form of short articles with link to results. In recent years, we’ve increasingly been directing folks to the FIS and USA Nordic sites for news, schedules, and results, and we’ll continue to do that. (logos & links below) USA Nordic has become the main organization behind the sports of ski jumping and Nordic Combined in the US, and it includes both the men’s and women’s national teams. They have a comprehensive website, and it has been redesigned for the 2022 season. Over the years, FIS has made their official websites for both jumping and NC much easier to navigate. They provide real-time scoring, and final results of qualifying and competition are reported immediately This site will now concentrate more on features than on-going news. Our new format will be released in several steps before the beginning of 2022. We hope you’ll continue to visit as we complete this transition Click large LOGOS for websites, month LINKS for calendar & results, big blue buttons for FACEBOOK .
SJUSA After 20 years, time for a new model
2021-22 SJCalendar & Results NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR
2021-22 NC Calendar & Results NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR
This page contains some of the content that will be on this site once our revamp is completed. We’re currently just trying out some concepts. This is an example of links within category headers. Comprehensive information on ski jumps worldwide www.skisprungschanzen.com (includes current & past jumps) Major Ski Museums National Ski Hall of Fame, Ishpeming MI American Ski Jumping HOF & Museum, Red Wing MN Engen Museum, Park City UT Regional and Local Museums, Club Museums Saint Paul Ski Club, Maplewood MN Norge Ski Club, Fox River Grove IL Digital Historical Displays From the Carl Darovich Collection Photo Album (1 of 80) containing photos, autographs, letters Handwritten log of US Records and Long Jumps, 1930s-’50s This material will be on a different page after the site is fully up and running. Provided here as examples while under development.
This is a test of two-column layout, We’ll likely use this for lengthy text sections, such as the example on Page 3. .
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This page contains some of the content that will be on this site once our revamp is completed. We’re currently just trying out some concepts. This is an example of links within category headers. Comprehensive information on ski jumps worldwide www.skisprungschanzen.com (includes current & past jumps) Major Ski Museums National Ski Hall of Fame, Ishpeming MI American Ski Jumping HOF & Museum, Red Wing MN Engen Museum, Park City UT Regional and Local Museums, Club Museums Saint Paul Ski Club, Maplewood MN Norge Ski Club, Fox River Grove IL Digital Historical Displays From the Carl Darovich Collection Photo Album (1 of 80) containing photos, autographs, letters Handwritten log of US Records and Long Jumps, 1930s-’50s This material will be on a different page after the site is fully up and running. Provided here as examples while under development.
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This page contains some of the content that will be on this site once our revamp is completed. We’re currently just trying out some concepts. This is an example of long text. About Ski Jumping (this appears on our old site) Hill Sizes and Scoring Explained Ski jumping is about flight, not height. It’s about how FAR you fly, and has nothing at all to do with height, either the height of the jump, or the height above the ground when the skier is in flight. Lots of photos are shot from ground level, shooting upwards with the sky as background, making it look like the jumper is flying high above the ground. This is misleading. The object of the sport is to stay in the air as long as possible, and the flight is measured from the point of takeoff to the point of landing. OK, you’re confused. Let’s explain. For example, the two hill sizes at the Olympics are referred to as “normal” (NH) and “large” (LH). The “par” distance on the NH is about 95 meters (312 feet). This can also be called a “K95” hill. It’s designed so good jumpers will fly that far ... or farther. A jumper gets 60 points for jumping to that spot, known as the K point. Jumpers get two points ADDED to the 60 point score for every meter they fly BEYOND the K point. They’ll LOSE 2 points for each meter they land short of K. So, why do they call it “K”? It’s the first letter of the German word for “calculation.” And why do I call it “par”? Because it’s a golf term familiar term to most Americans, who understand over & under par. The “par” distance on the large hill (LH) is about 125 meters (410 feet), which is often represented as K125. A jumper will get 60 points for flying that far, and 1.8 points per meter added or subtracted from their score for going beyond (or landing short of) the K point. Conversion from raw distance to points provides for standardization of scoring on differing hill sizes. There are judges, too, who can award up to 60 points per jump (20 points per judge) for good technique The term “style points” is a holdover from days gone by, when distances weren’t that great, and there was more emphasis on being “graceful” or “stylish.”
They are more appropriately thought of today as TECHNIQUE points or, simply, JUDGE POINTS. Most really good jumpers get between 16 and 19 points for technique from each of 3 judges (there are 5 judges; high and low scores are discarded). Typically, a good jumper will probably get about 55 points per round from the judges, and about 65 points for flying a bit beyond the K point, or 120 points total per jump (distance points plus judge points). So, in a two-jump event, on ANY HILL, a score of 240 is good. The best jumpers will get many more points because they’ll fly far beyond the K point; the best often score near 300 points, and a few have scored up to about 320, because the distance points are unlimited. In reality, distance rules, but when distances are close, judge points become a tiebreaker. HILL SIZE: FIS uses the term “hill size” (HS) to refer to the maximum safe distance. We do not use that term or that number in this discussion, because it’s confusing. Case in point ... Stefan Kraft of Austria holds the official record for the world's longest ski jump with 253.5 metres (832 ft), set on the ski flying hill in Vikersund, Norway in 2017. That hill is rated K-195 (what WE call “par”), with the FIS “hill size” (HS) rating at 225 meters. So the world record is more than 10% FURTHER than “hill size!” Confused yet? That “HS” number is useful to the competition jury. If jumpers start exceeding that distance, they may require using a lower start gate to reduce takeoff speed for the safety of the athletes. But ... since this is a definition of scoring, we stick with the the K-point ... the “par distance” which is the baseline for scoring.
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This page contains some of the content that will be on this site once our revamp is completed. We’re currently just trying out some concepts. This is an example of long text. About Ski Jumping (this appears on our old site) Hill Sizes and Scoring Explained Ski jumping is about flight, not height. It’s about how FAR you fly, and has nothing at all to do with height, either the height of the jump, or the height above the ground when the skier is in flight. Lots of photos are shot from ground level, shooting upwards with the sky as background, making it look like the jumper is flying high above the ground. This is misleading. The object of the sport is to stay in the air as long as possible, and the flight is measured from the point of takeoff to the point of landing. OK, you’re confused. Let’s explain. For example, the two hill sizes at the Olympics are referred to as “normal” (NH) and “large” (LH). The “par” distance on the NH is about 95 meters (312 feet). This can also be called a “K95” hill. It’s designed so good jumpers will fly that far ... or farther. A jumper gets 60 points for jumping to that spot, known as the K point. Jumpers get two points ADDED to the 60 point score for every meter they fly BEYOND the K point. They’ll LOSE 2 points for each meter they land short of K. So, why do they call it “K”? It’s the first letter of the German word for “calculation.” And why do I call it “par”? Because it’s a golf term familiar term to most Americans, who understand over & under par. The “par” distance on the large hill (LH) is about 125 meters (410 feet), which is often represented as K125. A jumper will get 60 points for flying that far, and 1.8 points per meter added or subtracted from their score for going beyond (or landing short of) the K point. Conversion from raw distance to points provides for standardization of scoring on differing hill sizes. There are judges, too, who can award up to 60 points per jump (20 points per judge) for good technique The term “style points” is a holdover from days gone by, when distances weren’t that great, and there was more emphasis on being “graceful” or “stylish.” They are more appropriately thought of today as TECHNIQUE points or, simply, JUDGE POINTS. Most really good jumpers get between 16 and 19 points for technique from each of 3 judges (there are 5 judges; high and low scores are discarded). Typically, a good jumper will probably get about 55 points per round from the judges, and about 65 points for flying a bit beyond the K point, or 120 points total per jump (distance points plus judge points). So, in a two-jump event, on ANY HILL, a score of 240 is good. The best jumpers will get many more points because they’ll fly far beyond the K point; the best often score near 300 points, and a few have scored up to about 320, because the distance points are unlimited. In reality, distance rules, but when distances are close, judge points become a tiebreaker. HILL SIZE: FIS uses the term “hill size” (HS) to refer to the maximum safe distance. We do not use that term or that number in this discussion, because it’s confusing. Case in point ... Stefan Kraft of Austria holds the official record for the world's longest ski jump with 253.5 metres (832 ft), set on the ski flying hill in Vikersund, Norway in 2017. That hill is rated K-195 (what WE call “par”), with the FIS “hill size” (HS) rating at 225 meters. So the world record is more than 10% FURTHER than “hill size!” Confused yet? That “HS” number is useful to the competition jury. If jumpers start exceeding that distance, they may require using a lower start gate to reduce takeoff speed for the safety of the athletes. But ... since this is a definition of scoring, we stick with the the K-point ... the “par distance” which is the baseline for scoring.
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